Gateway Logo More Information
Golden Isles Coupons

Department Title
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Lodging
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Hotels & Resorts
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Bed & Breakfasts
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Beaches
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Vacation Rentals
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Real Esate
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Tours & Attractions
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Art Galleries
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Shopping & Gifts
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Restaurants
spacer
arrow Entertainment & Leisure
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Fishing
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Golf
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Spas & Fitness
spacer
arrow Nature & Outdoors
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Weddings
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Articles
spacer

Diamondback Terrapins

Diamondback Terrapin in the Golden Isles of Georgia

Diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin) are turtles native to the brackish coastal wetlands of United States, from as far north as Cape Cod, Massachusetts, as far south as the Florida Keys, and as far west as Texas. They live in brackish salt marshes and freshwater tidal pools. Although they have many predators, raccoons pose one of the greatest threats, especially to egg-laying females, their nests and hatchlings. Another major threat to populations of terrapins occurs when females are killed by automibiles while crossing roads to access nesting grounds. Diamondback Terrapins prefer nesting on high ground, away from any possibility of flooding.

The species is named for the diamond pattern on top of its shell, but the overall pattern and coloration varies greatly between individuals. Their shell coloring can range from olive brown to grey to black, and their body color can be grey to white. All have a unique pattern of black lines or spots on their body and head. The species is sexually dimorphic in that the males rarely exceed 5.5 inches, while the females grow to an average of 8 inches, although they are capable of growing larger than 10 inches.

Diamondback Terrapin HabitatAdult diamondback terrapins mate and lay eggs in the early spring. Clutches average 6–12 eggs, with the majority laid between May and mid-July. Hatching occurs from late summer to early fall. Maturity in males is reached in 2–3 years at about 4.5 inches in length; females take longer, maturing at 6–7 years at a length of about 6.75 inches.

Fortunately, these turtles can be raised in captivity to compensate for the large numbers of female turtles killed each year while trying to cross highways. However, greater awareness of the highway crossing habits of these turtles may prevent tragic losses in years to come.

Article by Chuck Oldham; posted June 3, 2009.




AddThis Social Bookmark Button





Articles and Features RSS Articles and Features RSS

Privacy / Legal | Contact Us | Site Index | Coupons | Back To Home

Copyright 2011 by Gateway to The Golden Isles ®  and Trade Winds Advertising Inc. All rights reserved.

No part of this Web site may be copied for resale or redistribution without prior legal consent of the publishers in writing and is secured under protection of US and International copyright Laws.
See Privacy / Legal section for use and restrictions.

Publisher: Trade Winds Advertising Inc., P.O. Box 11563, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035 • Tel: (904) 432-8398


Notice: The Gateway To The Golden Isles website and Trade Winds Advertising Inc. is not affiliated with and does not endorse products or services of its members,  advertisers and sponsors. Opinions, beliefs, methods and ideas expressed in articles and pages on this web site belong to their respective independent authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, ideas and methods of the publisher. If you use this Web site, you agree to hold Gateway To The Golden Isles and the Publisher, Trade Winds Advertising Inc, harmless against all claims, liability or incidental damages arising from use of information, products or services provided herein.