Gateway Logo More Information
Golden Isles Coupons

Department Title
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Lodging
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Hotels & Resorts
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Bed & Breakfasts
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Beaches
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Vacation Rentals
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Real Esate
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Tours & Attractions
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Art Galleries
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Shopping & Gifts
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Restaurants
spacer
arrow Entertainment & Leisure
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Fishing
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Golf
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Spas & Fitness
spacer
arrow Nature & Outdoors
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Weddings
spacer
arrow Golden Isles Articles
spacer

Facts About Brunswick, Georgia

Brunswick is a city in the U.S. state of Georgia and the seat of Glynn County. The municipality is located in southeastern Georgia on a harbor on the eastern shore of Oglethorpe Bay, approximately 30 miles north of Florida. It was founded in 1771 by the Province of Georgia and incorporated on February 22, 1856. Plans for the city's streets and squares were laid out in the grid style following James Oglethorpe's Savannah Plan. In 1789, George Washington proclaimed Brunswick one of the five original ports of entry for the United States.

In 2006, the city proper had an estimated population of 16,074, and it had an estimated metropolitan population of 101,792 in July 2007. The city's metropolitan area is the twelfth largest in the state of Georgia and includes the counties of Glynn, Brantley, and McIntosh.

The Port of Brunswick is one of the nation's most productive ports on the Atlantic coast. The city's economy encompasses manufacturing, agricultural processing, and bulk cargoes. Tourism constitutes the largest industry in Brunswick and Glynn County. Brunswick is the center of Georgia's shrimp and crab industry; the city is nicknamed the "Shrimp Capital of the World" due to the many wild shrimp harvested in its local waters.

The headquarters facility of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC), one of the largest agencies of the United States Department of Homeland Security, is a vital part of Brunswick's economy. The facility, located 5 miles north of the central business district of the city, trains thousands of students monthly. Adjacent to FLETC is the Brunswick Golden Isles Airport, which provides commercial air service to the region.

History

The area's first European settler, Mark Carr, arrived in 1738. Carr, a Scotsman, was a captain in General James Oglethorpe’s Marine Boat Company. Upon landing, he established his 1,000-acre tobacco plantation along the Turtle River. The Royal Province of Georgia purchased Carr’s fields in 1771 and laid out the town of Brunswick in the grid style following Oglethorpe’s Savannah Plan. The town was then named after the duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg in Germany (the ancestral home of King George II of Great Britain).

The town of Brunswick began to scarcely grow when the American Revolution intervened, and a largely Loyalist population fled to Spanish Florida or the Caribbean basin. Development continued, however, and its strategic location along the Atlantic coast prompted George Washington to proclaim Brunswick one of the five original ports of entry for the colonies in 1789. In 1797, the Georgia General Assembly transferred the county seat of Glynn County from Frederica (on St. Simons Island) to Brunswick.

Glynn Academy, the first public building in Brunswick and the second-oldest high school in Georgia, was constructed in 1819. Throughout the former part of the nineteenth century, Brunswick gained a courthouse, a jail, and about thirty houses and stores. The town was officially incorporated as a city on February 22, 1856. By 1860, the city had a population of 468, a bank, a weekly newspaper, and a sawmill which employed nine workers.

Brunswick was abandoned during the Civil War when citizens were ordered to evacuate. The city, like many others in the South, suffered from post-war depression. After one of the nation’s largest lumber mills began operation on nearby St. Simons Island, economic prosperity returned. Rail lines were constructed from Brunswick to inland Georgia, and, unlike many other southern cities during the Reconstruction period, Brunswick experienced an economic boom.



Articles and Features RSS Articles and Features RSS

Privacy / Legal | Contact Us | Site Index | Coupons | Back To Home

Copyright 2011 by Gateway to The Golden Isles ®  and Trade Winds Advertising Inc. All rights reserved.

No part of this Web site may be copied for resale or redistribution without prior legal consent of the publishers in writing and is secured under protection of US and International copyright Laws.
See Privacy / Legal section for use and restrictions.

Publisher: Trade Winds Advertising Inc., P.O. Box 11563, Fernandina Beach, FL 32035 • Tel: (904) 432-8398


Notice: The Gateway To The Golden Isles website and Trade Winds Advertising Inc. is not affiliated with and does not endorse products or services of its members,  advertisers and sponsors. Opinions, beliefs, methods and ideas expressed in articles and pages on this web site belong to their respective independent authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions, beliefs, ideas and methods of the publisher. If you use this Web site, you agree to hold Gateway To The Golden Isles and the Publisher, Trade Winds Advertising Inc, harmless against all claims, liability or incidental damages arising from use of information, products or services provided herein.